Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

  • Members may log in to read judges’ queries and presenters’ replies.

Poster Discussion

  • Small_default_profile

    Leora Falk

    Guest
    May 21, 2012 | 04:02 p.m.

    I loved your field work footage and explanations. Do you have a sense of how your findings can/should inform policy to prevent leakage of CO2 from the ground?

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:19 p.m.

    Great question, and one that I frequently mull over because of my own interest in science and policy. As scientists, we can’t make the decisions, but we can provide information that describes “what is at stake” (a recent COMPASS blog provides a nice discussion of this very topic: http://compassblogs.org/blog/2012/05/21/but-wha...).
    With this in mind, I see my work as a small piece of the puzzle of how our activities effect ecosystems that will, in turn, effect us. This big picture can inform policy because it speaks to the risks that we are taking when we choose (or choose not to choose) a carbon emissions pathway.
    Do you have any thoughts on the matter? I would love to hear them. Thanks for your question!

  • May 22, 2012 | 01:09 p.m.

    Interesting research! How strong are interactive effects between permafrost loss with increasing temperatures, vegetation types (and shifts), and soil carbon storage? Playing out a model of elevated temperature effects on soil carbon on a longer temporal scale, it seems like you’d have to tease apart (long term?) changes due to vegetation shifts versus (short term?) term losses of carbon previously protected from decomposition by permafrost.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:45 p.m.

    Great point, and you’re absolutely right, there are a lot of interactions to consider here. I have yet to dive in to the modeling component of my research, but this will be important to understand the relative importance of short-term and long-term drivers. The data I have so far is a start, but I will be collecting permafrost samples and conducting temperature incubation experiments in the lab to better parameterize such a model.
    Thanks for your interest!

  • May 22, 2012 | 03:47 p.m.

    I’m really impressed with your video. Seeing the landscape context of the various habitat types you sampled helped me understand your methods. I’ve read that there is a tendency for arctic habitats to become more shrubby with increased temperatures. This means that grasslands (your highest C storage habitat) will become shrubby over time. What do you think this will do to carbon storage?

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:59 p.m.

    Shrub expansion is already being observed in the Arctic, so what you have described is a likely scenario. “Shrubification” is a process that takes decades and is key for understanding the long-term trajectory of the system. If grass patches transition to shrub cover, the carbon that is stored in these soils will be exposed to new environmental conditions, which will likely modify decomposition rates. I will have more information about vegetation-mediation of the link between aboveground and belowground temperatures in a few months. Stay tuned!

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:59 p.m.

    Shrub expansion is already being observed in the Arctic, so what you have described is a likely scenario. “Shrubification” is a process that takes decades and is key for understanding the long-term trajectory of the system. If grass patches transition to shrub cover, the carbon that is stored in these soils will be exposed to new environmental conditions, which will likely modify decomposition rates. I will have more information about vegetation-mediation of the link between aboveground and belowground temperatures in a few months. Stay tuned!

  • Icon for: Robert Hawley

    Robert Hawley

    Faculty
    May 23, 2012 | 04:14 p.m.

    Great Video! I particularly like your application of Remote Sensing techniques.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:20 p.m.

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Lee McDavid

    Lee McDavid

    Coordinator
    May 23, 2012 | 04:16 p.m.

    It was really helpful to see the landscape and then your labels of types of soils. Your field works photos were also great and helped me understand what you’re doing out there.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:22 p.m.

    I’m glad you liked it! When are you going to see it first hand though?

  • Small_default_profile

    Don Perovich

    Guest
    May 23, 2012 | 05:33 p.m.

    Great presentation! The integration of large scale (satellite) and small scale field sample is well done. The carbon cycle cartoon will informative and fun.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:24 p.m.

    High compliments from a master at weaving an exciting science story, thank you!

  • Small_default_profile

    Jeff Lombardo

    Guest
    May 23, 2012 | 08:40 p.m.

    Awesome video! Very clear explanation of the research question and the methods used to address them.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:26 p.m.

    Thanks so much for checking it out! It’s sure is a challenge to cover the bases in less than 3 minutes.

  • May 23, 2012 | 09:13 p.m.

    Great job. Looking forward to hearing about your findings.

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:28 p.m.

    Thanks a lot, I’ll keep you posted.

  • Icon for: Gifford Wong

    Gifford Wong

    Trainee
    May 23, 2012 | 09:34 p.m.

    Nice presentation, with concise explanations/graphics on key components of your research (such as the carbon cycle and Arctic habitats).

  • Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

    Julia Bradley-Cook

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 11:29 p.m.

    Thanks!

  • Small_default_profile

    Ross Lieb-Lappen

    Guest
    May 24, 2012 | 01:11 a.m.

    Awesome video. We should have enlisted your help for class. Why you were creating the carbon cycle animation a few weeks ago makes a lot more sense now.

  • Icon for: Kaitlin Keegan

    Kaitlin Keegan

    Trainee
    May 24, 2012 | 04:54 a.m.

    Great presentation. The video format, which combined your poster figures with audio and video excerpts, really conveyed more information than just reading your poster. Do you have any expectations based on your initial results, for how the landscape around Kangerlussuaq will change with the warming Arctic? Which type of landscape will dominate?

  • Icon for: Ross Virginia

    Ross Virginia

    Faculty
    May 24, 2012 | 08:34 a.m.

    Terrific video. It really adds to your poster. This is a difficult landscape to imagine and your video and explanation of the vegetation mosaic convey the complexity of the ecosystem and the need for an interdisciplinary tool kit to figure out future changes in soil carbon cycling.

  • Small_default_profile

    Maggie Bradley

    Guest
    May 28, 2012 | 08:41 p.m.

    good work Julia. The landscape is impressive

  • Small_default_profile

    Peter Jacobson

    Guest
    May 30, 2012 | 12:59 p.m.

    Great video Julia! It will be very interesting to see what you find out regarding the temperature sensitivity of decomposition across the landscaoe classes.

  • Small_default_profile

    Maggie Bradley

    Guest
    June 1, 2012 | 12:23 p.m.

    good work Julia. The landscape is impressive

  • Icon for: Sam Fey

    Sam Fey

    Trainee
    June 1, 2012 | 12:24 p.m.

    Excellent video that complements your poster, and I learned a lot from watching this. I especially enjoyed the conceptual figures embedded laboratory your video explaining carbon cycling. It seems that you have made an effective use of combining laboratory, field, and satellite data.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

Icon for: Julia Bradley-Cook

JULIA BRADLEY-COOK

Presenter’s IGERT
Dartmouth
Years in Grad School: 3

Judges’
Choice
Community
Choice

Molecules in a Living Landscape: Soil Carbon Storage and Vegetation in a Greenland Mosaic

Arctic soils hold an estimated 1672 petagrams of carbon—that is more than 2 times the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Temperature is a main control of biological soil respiration, so a warming Arctic climate will release soil organic into the atmosphere. Contemporary models use biochemical principles to predict soil carbon response to temperature, but these predictions often differ from direct observations because they fail to represent ecosystem variables that affect the nature of soil organic matter and the subsurface environment. This study examines soil carbon storage across an Arctic tundra landscape that is variable with respect to vegetation type, soil characteristics, landscape position. We analyzed satellite imagery to characterize the variation of vegetation types and to select representative sites for plant community observation, soil sample collection and soil respiration measurements. With remote sensing and intense field observation, this study links local scale properties to landscape level dynamics to understand spatial variability of carbon storage and the implications for processes and dynamics at the landscape scale. A long-term goal of this research is to develop a spatially explicit model of soil organic matter, soil respiration and temperature sensitivity of soil carbon dynamics for western Greenland tundra ecosystems.