Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

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Poster Discussion

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 21, 2012 | 10:01 p.m.

    Hi everyone, I’d just like to say THANK YOU! to all people who have voted thus far, and a future thank you to those who will :) I’m truly amazed and extremely thankful for how much support we’ve been given! Thank you to everyone!!

  • Icon for: Yury Gogotsi

    Yury Gogotsi

    Faculty
    May 22, 2012 | 01:41 a.m.

    Kristy, you have a great poster and an amazing video!

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 07:21 a.m.

    Thank you Dr. Gogotsi!

  • Icon for: Yury Gogotsi

    Yury Gogotsi

    Faculty
    May 22, 2012 | 08:44 a.m.

    Good luck, Kristy!

  • Icon for: Danielle Tadros

    Danielle Tadros

    Coordinator
    May 22, 2012 | 08:53 a.m.

    Great video, Kristy! You do a wonderful job of explaining your research.

  • Icon for: Erin Baker

    Erin Baker

    Faculty
    May 22, 2012 | 09:11 a.m.

    Innovative work. I’d love to hear more about the applications beyond high fashion.

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 09:29 a.m.

    Thanks for the inquiry!

    A few applications towards the end of the video include biomedical, military and space applications.

    For biomedical applications, wearable and biocompatible energy storage can help power other wearable bio-sensors or communication devices, and potentially pace-makers.

    Soldiers currently carry batteries that weigh up to 12lbs to power all of their gear, when wearable supercapacitors combined with energy harvesting devices like piezo-electrics or solar panels could help soldiers charge up during a mission while reducing weight and bulkiness.

    And of course, space suits were the original smart garment, having multiple layers of smart textiles. Again integrating energy storage into the suit could help to reduce the weight and bulkiness and give astronauts more freedom of movement. If only there was another shuttle mission…

    Let me know if you have any more questions!

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    Jill Buckley

    Guest
    May 22, 2012 | 09:55 a.m.

    Amazing work, Kristy!

  • Small_default_profile

    Martin Crowe

    Guest
    May 22, 2012 | 10:54 a.m.

    Great video and fascinating work. Congratulations guys!

  • Icon for: Chris Dennison

    Chris Dennison

    Trainee
    May 22, 2012 | 01:56 p.m.

    Great video! Very impressive!

  • Icon for: Terri La Count

    Terri La Count

    Trainee
    May 22, 2012 | 02:32 p.m.

    Very interesting project!

  • Small_default_profile

    Jay Bhatt

    Guest
    May 22, 2012 | 05:11 p.m.

    Kristy, Excellent video that superbly explains your State of the Art, innovative and multidisciplinary work. Very impressive! Congratulations. Wishing you the best,

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 24, 2012 | 05:54 p.m.

    Thank you so much for all your support Jay!! We truly appreciate it!!

  • Icon for: Lee McDavid

    Lee McDavid

    Coordinator
    May 23, 2012 | 04:30 p.m.

    Wow, who knew smart garments existed! Did you have to patent any of your work?

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 23, 2012 | 04:43 p.m.

    Yes it does! and yes we have filed a patent on our work.

  • Icon for: Mariko Walton

    Mariko Walton

    Coordinator
    May 24, 2012 | 12:25 p.m.

    This has great potential for field applications as you mentioned such as for military use but if integrated into the garment, does this make the garment non-washable? How robust would these supercapacitor garments be to the elements and water immersion?

  • Small_default_profile

    Gloria Gomez

    Guest
    May 25, 2012 | 11:01 a.m.

    I really like this, The point of view that you mention is excellent. Maybe the new technology can add something that they can clean without use a regular washable machine.

  • Icon for: Kristy Jost

    Kristy Jost

    Presenter
    May 24, 2012 | 01:43 p.m.

    Excellent question!

    We do not expect these garments, much like a wool suit or silk dress to be washed in a washer or dryer, but would be “dry clean” only. We can also potentially coat the supercapacitors and other devices in a polyester or nylon resin while preserving flexibility and breathability to make them fully resistant to the elements, but again probably not for the washer and dryer.

    Another hope is that given these are “smart” materials, it will be possible one day to have the garments clean themselves. The army has soldier’s t-shirts embedded with silver fibers, which are antimicrobial, to kill germs and prevent an odors or bacteria from building up. Smart Wool socks also have silver fibers embedded in them to keep from smelling. So self laundering clothing is not an unforeseeable option.

    Again thank you for raising a very important question!

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

  1. Kristy Jost
  2. /igert2012/to_client?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.igert.org%2Fprofiles%2F4162
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. /igert2012/to_client?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.igert.org%2Fprojects%2F131
  6. Drexel University
  1. Carlos Perez
  2. /igert2012/to_client?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.igert.org%2Fprofiles%2F4090
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. /igert2012/to_client?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.igert.org%2Fprojects%2F131
  6. Drexel University
 
 
 
 
Judges’, Community,
& Public Choice

Energy Textiles: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Integrated Electronics in "Smart" Garments

Fashionable Technology is a multidisciplinary field of study, focusing on the fabrication of wearable electronics by combining fashion design techniques with advanced nanotechnology. Applications of fashionable technology range from wearable and soft bio-sensors to integrated circuitry that can monitor human vitals in hospitals, combat, or in space. Beyond the engineering perspective, the field has shown applicability in the aesthetic realm as a transformable means of expression on the body, including clothes that change color and shape while performing electronic functions similar to an iPhone. However, previous designers and researchers in the field of “smart” textiles still struggle with the challenge of finding seamless solutions to currently available, and bulky, power sources. Therefore, the focus of our presentation will be on one of the fundamental components to all electronics: energy storage. We will present cutting edge research on textile energy storage, the design and engineering challenges researchers like ourselves still face, and how textile energy storage fits into the world-scope of research on flexible energy technologies. We will also elaborate on the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and how it has been a key element to the success of our research.